FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Sharon Phillips

Phone: 1-954-575-4973

Cell: 1-954-540-1896

Twitter: HBOT 2010

Email: Sharon@hbot2010.net

or visit: www.hbot2010.net

INTERNATIONAL MEDICAL SYMPOSIUM “HBOT 2010” SET FOR IRVINE MARRIOTT, JULY 22-25

Monday, June 7th, Newport Beach, CA: Physicians and medical practitioners from around the globe will gather at the Irvine Marriott Hotel July 22-25, for “HBOT 2010”, an educational symposium, of world-wide medical significance.

Their focus will be on the healing and life sustaining benefits of oxygen, in the treatment of serious medical conditions. New to this year’s symposium will be the latest information on the treatment of war veterans with blast injuries, as well as cutting edge information on HBOT’s use for people with cancer and diabetes.

Hyperbaric Oxygenation Therapy Treatment, (known as HBOT), originated with the treatment of deep sea divers many years ago. Today it is successfully used to treat a wide range of illnesses, injuries and chronic conditions. “Dozens of scientific papers will be presented by international specialists, who are making medical history using oxygen — in its many forms — for healing and sustaining life. This conference will feature the most focused group of oxygen specialists in the world,” said Dr. Donald L. Jolly-Gabriel, Ph.D., Chairman of the Richard A. Neubauer Research Institute, (RANRI) sponsors of the event. This is the 7th bi-annual symposium, presented by the institute.

Some 30 experts, using oxygen in the successful treatment of such diverse conditions as: traumatic brain injury, autism, cerebral palsy, lyme disease, spinal cord injury, alzheimer’s, stroke, diabetic wounds, multiple sclerosis, near-drowning, coma, anoxic encephalopathy, childhood mitochondrial diseases and more; will meet in Orange County, CA., for the first time. An exposition featuring some of the most advanced HBOT equipment and items in related fields will also be available to those in attendance.

“This forum provides a rare opportunity for the public to join the medical community in learning about break-through modalities in use here and abroad, to treat these serious conditions,” Jolly-Gabriel said. “Parents who are seeking alternative treatments for children with any of these conditions are urged to attend. They will interact doctors using HBOT and learn first-hand from and patients how HBOT has changed their prognosis and enhanced their lives.

“Oxygen is God’s gift to us,” Jolly-Gabriel added. “It is the single most important element necessary to sustain life. Although it is readily available everywhere, we are only now beginning to realize its true medical significance. It is a magnificent step forward in medicine.” The symposium will provide educational interaction with many of the world’s most eminent experts in the field.

OUTSTANDING SPEAKERS

Among featured speakers will be professor K. K. Jain, author of, “The Handbook of Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy,” (now the “Textbook of Hyperbaric Medicine, currently in its fifth edition).” Jain is a retired professor and a highly respected consultant in neurology and hyperbaric medicine. He is also the author of more than 415 publications including 16 books on related topics.

Karen Simmons, CEO and founder of “Autism Today,” will be featured at an Author’s Luncheon Friday, July 23 at noon. Simmons, is the co-author of “Chicken Soup for the Soul, Children with Special Needs,” (co-authored with Jack Canfield, Mark Victor Hansen and Heather McNamara); and both “The Official Autism 101 Manual,” (an IPPY Gold Medal winner); and the recently released, “Autism Tomorrow, The Complete Guide to helping your Child Thrive in the Real World.”

Dr. Paul Harch, of the University of Louisiana Medical Center, who developed the HBOT protocol being used to restore the lives of American military personnel, following Traumatic Brain Injuries in combat, will be lauded for his work, during the symposium.

In addition, Some of the most recent studies conducted by world renowned brain specialist Dr. Daniel Amen, M.D., of Newport Beach, will also be presented.

 

WHO SHOULD ATTEND

HBOT 2010 is designed not only for medical professionals, but for or those who are affected by any of the conditions listed above, or involved in related associations, (i.e. the America Cancer Society, The Autism Society, the Multiple Sclerosis Society, etc.). The HBOT 2010 agenda includes new approaches in oxygen therapy for the treatment and management of these illnesses.

Attendance will be beneficial to medical professionals including: Neurologists, Pediatricians, Neonatologists, Perinatologists, Physical Therapists, Physiatrists, Orthopedic Surgeons and other professionals. It will afford them new insights into this remarkable medical option as well as practical applications for its use in conjunction with their specialties. Non-professionals such as: care-takers in coma recovery cases, stroke recovery or family members assisting people with disabilities, will also find this program beneficial. “We have done everything possible to make attending this conference exciting, convenient and affordable,” Jolly-Gabriel said. HBOT 2010 has negotiated a conference rate at the Irvine Marriott Hotel, of just $109 per night for those who register before June 15.

Register on-line at http://www.hbot2010.net/index.php. Or, visit the web site for additional information on the coming symposium, conference and exposition.

 (Medical writers and bloggers, affiliated recognized media outlets, are invited to cover the event)

Sharon Phillips

HBOT2010 – July 22-25 Marriott Hotel, Irvine, California

Tel: 954 540 1896

Fax: 954 827 0723

sharon@hbot2010.net

www.hbot2010.net

http://twitter.com/HBOT2010

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The AAHA, American Association for Hyperbaric Awareness, has been working quietly in the background for the last couple of years, representing your interests, namely, having hbot available to you when it is needed.

The AAHA does not represent any manufacturer or company trying to sell HBOT products.
The AAHA is not being used to sell chambers
The AAHA is not being used to promote any doctor or hbot center or to recruit business.
The AAHA has not made any promises or guarantees to you.
The AAHA has never asked you to pay any fees, dues, or contributions.
The AAHA is a 501 (c) 3 nonprofit organization dedicated to making America aware of the value of HBOT and the need to have insurance and Medicaid pay for hbot for brain injury or neurological conditions.
The AAHA is the only organization following a solid plan to bring HBOT to the forefront for anyone you know who may benefit.

The TV taping of a PBS program telling about the benefits of HBOT for neurological injury taking place in Feb. is the direct result of the AAHA’s efforts. This program will be aired in the Dallas-Ft. Worth area on PBS the end of Feb. It will be followed by PBS airing all over the USA in the weeks to follow.

Can you imagine the effect this can have on your chances of getting affordable HBOT in the future. With this type exposure, the chances of getting it approved for insurance coverage will be much stronger. Insurance companies will be viewing it and it can be used to convince them to cover your hbot.

Isn’t it about time we supported the AAHA? All you have to do to support them is join AAHASupporters@ yahoogroups. com. The strength is in numbers. If the AAHA can get this time of program across the USA and public officials and politicians begin to recognise HBOT, then we want the AAHA to continue to have the backing they need to get things done. If they know thousands of people are behind this effort they will listen. It is time for you to begin spreading the word to all your friends on all your email forums on how important it is to join the AAHA.

Remember, our strength lies in numbers. On the 2 main hbot groups, HBOTherapyforAutism and NeuroHBOT, we have almost 2400 families represented. If all of you would simple join the AAHA supporters group, when the time comes to write a letter, send an email, or take whatever action is needed in support of the AAHA, we can help them have the strength they need to be heard.

The AAHA has been in the background, now it is time to bring them to the forefront.

To join the AAHA, you can simply send a blank email to AAHAsupporters- subscribe@ yahoogroups. com or go the web page at http://health. groups.yahoo. com/group/ AAHAsupporters/

Thank you and please support the AAHA
Robert Hartsoe

Paul G. Harch, M.D.
1816 Industrial Boulevard
Harvey, LA 70058
504-309-4948 or 504-366-1445
Fax: 504-366-1029
paulharchmd@aol.com

EDUCATIONAL  BACKGROUND

1976-1980

John Hopkins University School of Medicine
Doctor of Medicine, 1980

1972-1976

The University of California, Irvine
Bachelor of Science, Biology
Magna cum laude, Phi Beta Kappa

POSTGRADUATE  TRAINING

9/1987

13th Annual National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration Physician Diving Accident Medical Management Course, NOAA facility, Key Biscayne, Florida

7/1986 – 7/1987

Radiology resident, Louisiana State University School of Medicine, Charity Hospital, New Orleans, Louisiana

6/1986

Orientation course in Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy and Wound Care, Long Beach Medical Center, Long Beach California

6/1980 – 12/1982

Two years general surgery training at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Denver, Colorado, with six months leave for auto-ped accident

OTHER TRAINING

7/1/2004

LSU Animal Care Orientation Training for basic science investigators.

3/4/2002

Completion of self-certification course/Human Subjects Protection Educational Program for clinical investigators.

WORK EXPERIENCE

7/5/2005 – Present

Director, LSUHSC/Medical Center of Louisiana, New Orleans Hyperbaric Medicine and Wound Care Department

7/1993 – Present

Medical Director, LSU Hyperbaric Medicine and Wound Care Fellowship Program.  JoEllen Smith Medical Center (New Orleans, LA) 1993-5/1999, St. Charles General Hospital (New Orleans, LA) 5/1999-12/2004, West Jefferson Medical Center (Marrero, LA) 12/2004-present, Medical Center of Louisiana New Orleans 7/5/2005 – present.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
CONTACT: LESLIE CAPO
(504) 568-4806; CELL (504) 452-9166

New Orleans, LA — Dr. Paul Harch, LSUHC Clinical Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine, is the principal investigator of a pilot study to determine the effectiveness of one or two courses of hyperbaric oxygen therapy in treating chronic traumatic brain injury (TBI) and TBI with post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).  The study grew out of previous experience in treating TBI with hyperbaric oxygen therapy with improvement in symptoms and function.

Thirty participants will be recruited — half will have traumatic brain injury and half will have both traumatic brain injury and post traumatic stress disorder.  The participants will undergo oral, written, and computer tests, ass well as an MRI (if the participant has not had one since injury) and SPECT brain imaging.  Participants will have 40 hyperbaric oxygen therapy treatments and can request up to 40 more if not improved to his/her satisfaction.

Certain conditions preclude participation including pregnancy and increased risk for rare HBOT complications.

Possible benefits include improvement in thinking ability, quality of life, and reduction of PTSD symptoms: however there may be no benefits.

Results will be measured by brain blood flow imaging, written tests for memory and thinking, and questionnaires about quality of life and health.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, a traumatic brain injury (TBI) is caused by a blow or jolt to the head or a penetrating head injury that disrupts the normal function of the brain.  The severity of a TBI my range from “mild,” i.e., a brief change in mental status or consciousness to “severe,” i.e., an extended period of unconsciousness or amnesia after the injury.  TBIs contribute to a substantial number of deaths and cases of permanent disability annually.  CDC estimates that at least 5.3 million Americans, about 2% of the U.S. population, currently have a long-term or lifelong need for help to perform activities of daily living as a result of a TBI.

TBI has been called the signature wound of the Wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.  A RAND Corporation study released in April “estimates that about 320,000 service members may have experienced a traumatic brain injury during deployment — the term used to describe a range of injuries from mild concussions to severe penetrating head wounds.  Just 43 percent reported ever being evaluated by a physician for that injury.  One-year estimates of the societal cost associated with treated cases of mild traumantic brain injury range up to $32,000 per case, while estimated for treated moderate to severe cases range from $268,000 to more than $408,000.  Estimates of the total one-year societal cost of the roughly 2,700 cases of traumatic brain injury identified to date  range from $591 million to $910 million.”

A 2005 article in the New England Journal of Medicine, Traumatic Brain Injury in the War Zone, by Susan Okie, MD, says “among surviving soldiers wounded in combat in Iraq and Afghanistan, TBI appears to account for a larger proportion of casualties than it has in other recent U.S. wars.  According to the Joint Theater Trauma Registry, compiled by the U.S. Army Institute of Surgical Research, 22 percent of the wounded soldiers from these conflicts who have passed through the military’s Landstuhl Regional Medical Center in Germany had injuries to the head, face, or neck.  This percentage can serve as a rough estimate of the fraction who have TBI, according to Deborah L. Warden, a neurologist and psychiatrist at Walter Reed Army Medical Center who is the national director of the Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center (DVBIC).  Warden said the true proportion is probably higher, since some cases of closed brain injury are not diagnosed promptly.”

For more information or to find out if you qualify, call 504-309-4948.

Hperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) appears to be a safe and effective treatment for Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI), Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and Depression.  Thanks to the work of the American Association for Health Freedom,  and their petition to Congress,  it looks as though our veterans will soon be receiving this much-needed treatment.

For each of you who took time to write your representatives regarding this issue – Thank you.  The legislation which was passed and signed into law is a start, but this program needs to be funded and sustained.  Please see the link at the bottom of this piece to ask Congress for its continued support of HBOT for veterans.
* From the E-Newsletter, [American Association for Health Freedom]

AAHF Scores a Victory with HBOT for Wounded Veterans

Hope For Traumatic Brain Injury, Diabetic Failure-to-Heal Wounds and More?

On September 30,  President Bush signed into law the FY2009 Continuing Resolution that contains the Defense Appropriations bill.  In doing so, crucial funding became available to complete a scientific study important to all Americans.

Seventeen years ago, Paul G. Harch, M.D., discovered that hyperbaric oxygen therapy at 1.5 atmospheres of pressure  (HBOT 1.5)  could repair a chronic traumatic brain injury (TBI).  Dr. Harch, director of the Hyperbaric Medicine Fellowship at Louisiana State University’s School of Medicine and an AAHF member, has used the therapy on over 700 patients and has taught the technique to hundreds of doctors.

In 2008, Dr. Harch applied HBOT 1.5 to five combat veterans of the current war who have traumatic brain injury and post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) from concussive blasts.  So far, all of the veterans treated have significan recovery.  Eighty percent no longer have PTSD and all are improved.

During this same year,  Dr. Harch testified in fron to the Surgeon General of the Navy and the Deputy Commandant of the Marine Corps.  He told the stories of the five combat veterans he treated with HBOT 1.5; three of those veterans were in the same room.

One of them, a judge who served as a general in the Army Reserves, endured a year of treatment failures at Walter Reed.  He is now back on the bench, fully recovered in 120 days, after 80 HBOT 1.5 treatments.  The Health Freedom Foundation, sponsored a Marine machine gunner who expreienced seven concussive events from roadside bombs during two tours in Iraq.  Now, after HBOT treatments, his migraine headaches have disappeared, his sleep is restored , his PTSD is gone.  He is now actively employed.  He has his life back, as do other veterans who have undergone HBOT treatment.

At Louisianna State University in New Orleans, under an approved study protocol, Dr. Harch is now treating another thirty veterans of the war who have TBI and PTSD.  AAHF sought funding from Congress for this important study for the past two years. This year, after nearly 200 visitis to members of Congress, funding was finally provided.

In April 2008, the RAND Corporation, a non-profit “think tank” highly respected by the government and NGOs, found that of the 1.6 million veterans of the war, 300,000 have PTSD, 320,000 suffer TBI, and 80,000 have depression.  Current treatment costs for each of these conditions, when treated separately, is more than the cost associated with HBOT 1.5.

HBOT 1.5  one-time cost is US $16,000 (80 treatments at $200 per session) and apprears to treat all three symptoms simultaneously;  the earlier a person is treated, the more effective the recovery, and the fewer the treatments needed.

Hyperbaric oxygen therapy at 2.4 atmospheres of pressure is already used 10,000 times a day at over 900 locations for everything from non-healing diabetic wounds and radiation injuries from cancer treatment, to fourteen other Medicare-reimbursable and FDA-approved indications.  HBOT 1.5 is a dose of HBOT tat clinical experience shows is safe and effective for TBI.

According to Dr. Ted Fogarty, Chairman of Radiology at the University of North Dakota School of Medicine, “Functional neuroimaging shows HBOT revitalizes brain tissues and restores normal brain metabolism in vastly different areas of the brain in ways that other existing treatments cannot.  To leave these injured neurons in our brave veterans to wither on the vine seems criminal when HBOT 1.5 is available and works.”

Today a multi-state coordinated effort is under way to treat vets at 78 locations.  We expect this AAHF-coordinated effort will result in the necessary scientific proof to establish HBOT 1.5 as the standard of care for acute and chronic neurological injuries, and we hope it will secure reimbursement by the VA, Tri-Care, Medicare and civilian insurance.

The body of scientific evidence indicates that modern medicine has overlooked hyperbaric oxygen as a key tool in the treatment of strokes, diabetic failure-to-heal wounds, and conditions like reflex sympathetic dystrophy.  Timely HBOT therapy could reduce the incidence of stroke (the leading cause of disability in the U.S., with over 500,000 reported cases each year) and amputations due to diabetic failure-to-heal wounds.  HBOT has sound science, many years of clinical practice and a convincing reason for all of us to seek access when it can be of help.

Veterans who wish treatment can can contact Teri Rich at 801-964-2008.

ARTICLE SOURCE:
HyperMED NeuroRecovery Australia
http://www.hypermed.com.au

Continuation  of  Previous Entry —

veterans-new

HBOT also has beneficial effects on vasospasm and cellular reperfusion injury.  Multiple studies have shown that HBOT reduces cerebral edema and decreases intracranial pressure (ICP).   A summary of the HBOT/cerebral edema studies in animals is that HBOT has two differenct effects: one reducing brain edema (injured brain), and another producing brain edema (normal brain).  This toxic effect on normal brain causes a breakdown in the protective vasoconstriction of arterioles, resulting in a rapid rise in brain blood flow and deterioration in EEG.

Rockswold in 1992 reported the most exhaustive, rigorous, and important study to date in acute TBI (traumatic brain injury) in an attempt to refute or affirm all of the above animal and human data.  Conducted from 1983 to 1989 the study enrolled 168 patients with GCS or 9 or less in a RPCT design and stratified the patients by age and GCS.  Patients were treated at 1.5 ATA/60 every 8 hours for a maximum of two weeks immediately post TBI or until awake or deceased during these two weeks.  The average patient entered treatment 26 hours post TBI and received 21 treatments.  Overall mortality was significantly reduced 50% in the HBOT group and as high as 56% and 60% in the elevated ICP and GCS 4-6 subgroups.

This reduction in mortality has never been equaled by any therapy in the medical armamentarium except possibly the ambulance, or in the case of the military, the helicopter.  Adding HBOT to helicopter evacuation of casualties should further decrease morbidity and mortality of injured soldiers.  This is the foundation of the DoD-BIRR Project.

References:

Harch, Paul, M.D., “FEB Scientific Background and Overview,” 2005 (81 scientific references)

Harch, Paul, M.D., “Evidence for Use of Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy for Acute Traumatic Brain Injury,” 2001

I had the opportunity to visit with Teri Rich, the founder of Advanced Wound Care Systems, Inc. located in Taylorsville, Utah located inside the Salt Lake City metropolitan area.

Teri Rich and Dr. Sherman Johnson informed me that Advanced Wound Care Systems has been selected as one of approximately 90 installations around the U.S. for providing a Hyperbaric Oxygen therapy program for veterans.   

For more detailed information, you will need to contact Teri Rich directly at 801-964-2008.  Be sure to mention that you found her through the Hyperbaric Discovery blog.

veterans-new

 Here is the beginning of the overview for this program.  It will be completed in subsequent entries:

Department of Defense Brain Injury Rescue and Rehabilitation Project (DoD-BIRR) Rescue for Blunt Trauma, Crush & Acute Traumatic Brain Injury
Summary of Scientific Backgrounds & Overview
 
 Oxygen delivered under pressure, Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT) is one of the most powerful drugs known to man.  Simultaneously, HBOT delivers the substrate of life, oxygen, for which there is no substitute.  HBOT has profound beneficial effects on injury pathophysiologic processes that are common in military casualties.  Moreover, it has been shown to positively impact traumatic brain injury, compartment syndrome, burns, hemorrhage, and reperfusion injury.  These injuries and injury processes comprise the bulk of battlefield caualties.  With timely intervention of HBOT the morbidity and mortality of injured soldiers should substantially improve as they have in their civilian counterparts.  Past foreign military experience strongly suggests this benefit in extremity wounds and it is our conviction that United States soldiers deserve nothing less.  This is the goal of the Brain Injury Rescue and Rehabilitation Project (Dod-BIRR).

HBOT has both acute and chronic drug effects.  HBOT exerts these effects by obeying the Universal Gas Laws, the most important of which is Henry’s Law (2).  Henry’s Law states that the concentration of a gas in solution is proportional to the pressure of that gas interfacing with the solution.

At the point of three atmospheres absolute of pure oxygen (3 ATA), just slightly more than the amount the U.S. Navy has used for 50 years in the treatment of divers with decompression sickness, we can dissolve enough oxygen in the plasma to render red blood cells useless.  Under these conditions as blood passes through the tiniest blood vessels tissue cells will extract all of the dissolved oxygen in the blood without touching the oxygen bound to hemoglobin.  This amount of dissolved oxygen alone can exceed the amount necessary for the tissue to sustain life.  In other words, you don’t need red blood cells for life at 3 ATA of 100% oxygen.  This ability to maintain life without blood has obvious potential to battlefield casualties awaiting transfusion.

As a result of Henry’s Law HBOT is able to exert a variety of drug effects on acute pathyophysiologic processes.  These have been well documented over the past 50 years and include reduction of hypoxia (lack of oxygen), inhibition of reperfusion injury (immune response to injury), reduction of edema (swelling), blunting of systemic inflammatory responses, and a multitude of others.  In addition, repetitive HBOT in wound models acts as a DNA stimulating drug to effect tissue growth.    HBOT has been shown to interact with the DNA of cells in damaged areas to begin the production of repair hormones, proteins, and cell surface receptors that are stimulated by the repair hormones.  The resultant repair processes include replication of the cells responsible for tissure strength (fibroblasts), new blood vessel growth, bone healing and strengthening, and new skin growth.

In the past 12 years scientific research has unequivocally shown that the only drug to completely or nearly completely reverse the reperfusion injury process is hyperbaric oxygen.  This  physiological reaction of the body to trauma is  is a major  source of injury that battlefield casualties experience.  In multiple experiments with different models, different organ systems, different types of blood flow reduction or absence (e.g., heart attack, stroke, cardiac arrest, carbon monoxide, tourniqueting of an extremity, etc.) timely HBOT within hours of reperfusion injury has been shown to completely or nearly completely reverse reperfusion injury.

Simultaneously, due to HBOT’s ability to dissolve large amounts of oxygen in the liquid portion of the blood, oxygen-enriched plasma is able to reach damaged areas of tissue not accessible by normal blood flow and restore oxdative function to those areas.  The net result is a dramatic reduction in the secondary injury process, improved viability of tissue that would otherwise die.

In addition, twenty percent of the wounded in Iraqi experience traumatic brain injury (TBI) a diffuse cerebral insult characterized by primary mechanical disruption of tissue and secondary injury from ischemia, hypoxia, edema, vasospasm, neurochemicals and reperfusion injury.  A review of the medical literature shows that there is substantial data proving a beneficial effect of HBOT on the secondary injury processes of acute TBI.  HBOT has been shown indirectly to improve ischemia and hypoxia in acute TBI by its effect on aerobic metabolism and EEG.  The neurosurgeon authors of the Rockswold study conclude that  “HBOT should be initiated as soon as possible after acute severe traumatic brain injury.”

— TO BE CONTINUED in PART 2